Energy Performance Certificate


EPCs
Why do I need an EPC?
It is a legal requirement to have a valid Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) when a building is sold, rented or constructed.

Your property's EPC needs to be available to potential buyers as soon as you start to market your property for sale or rent. This will inform people how energy efficient the property is, including any potential savings on fuel payments.

You must get an approved /accredited Domestic Energy Assessor to produce the EPC, which provides information about a property’s energy use and typical energy costs..

If you implement any of the energy efficiency recommendations outlined in your EPC, you may wish to get a fresh EPC done to include these improvements. Failure to have a valid EPC may result in a fine, although there are exemptions e.g. listed properties.

What is an EPC?
An Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) measures the energy efficiency of a property on a scale of A-G. Energy Performance Certificates were introduced in England and Wales in 2007 and are a legal requirement for a building to be sold, let or constructed. Once obtained, an EPC is valid for 10 years.

The most efficient homes - which should have the lowest fuel bills - are in band A. The Certificate also tells you, on a scale of A-G, about the impact the home has on the environment. Better-rated homes should have less impact through Carbon Dioxide (CO2) emissions.

The average property in the UK is in bands D-E for both ratings. The Certificate includes recommendations on ways to improve the home's energy efficiency to save you money and help the environment. EPCs apply also to commercial buildings and are rated only by Carbon Dioxide emission ratings on a scale of A-G but can’t carry those out for you presently, sorry.

Minimum Energy Efficiency Standards (MEES) Legislation In April 2018 Minimum Energy Efficiency Standards introduced made it a legal requirement for all privately owned properties to have an EPC rating of at least an 'E' before they are sold or let. The legislation applies to both domestic and commercial properties, although there are some exemptions, for example if a property is a listed building.

Those who fail to make the necessary changes will be subject to the appropriate fines: up to £5,000 for domestic dwellings and up to £150,000 for non-domestic properties.

What is involved?
If you require an EPC you will need an accredited energy assessor to conduct an energy assessment.

We can carry that out for you. Contact us

Paul will need to access all rooms as well as the loft. They are also required to inspect heating systems and controls, take measurements and take photographs of all key data included in the survey. The survey is non-invasive and a visual inspection is all that is required. You can ask the assessor how long he expects to be as the time varies between properties.

We can input this information on site or at home, to produce an Energy Performance Certificate which is lodged to the central register.

How do I get a copy of an EPC?
If you have the report reference number (RRN) or an address, you can easily retrieve an EPC by going to http://www.epcregister.com/